Gallery on The Green

HISTORY OF THE SHOW.

Jim Beebe our program coordinator made arrangement for our members to display our work at the Market Mall Gallery. Fourteen of our members submitted work for the show.

The show was to start in May 2020 but due to the Covid-19 outbreak it was postponed for a year.  Here you get a chance to see the items that will be in the show next year.

Meet the Makers

Jim Beebe

Jim Beebe

Biography

Working with wood has been part of my life for as long as I can remember.  My earliest experiences with turning were fostered by two wonderful teachers – Mr. Lewis at Westmount, and Walter Allen at BRCI.  Thanks to them I learned all the basic skills and eventually ended up teaching woodworking in the Saskatoon Public School System. I am a founding member of the Sask. Wood Workers Guild and gained much more skill and knowledge from the members of the club.  About 5 years ago I learned about the Hub City Turners Club and promptly joined the club.  This decision changed my retirement life.  I have learned so much from the club members and have embraced various skills and techniques learned from meetings, demonstrations and conversations.   Two aspects of woodturning occupy mind at this time – segmented turning and dyeing wood various colors.  Who knows what will occupy my mind next year.

Don Buck

Don Buck

Biography

I consider myself lucky to have grown up on a farm in southwestern Saskatchewan. Not a lot of trees around but our yard had rows and rows that I spent countless hours in and that is where I developed a love for wood. I did a few wood projects growing up, one in particular with my Grandpa where he said I had a “carpenter’s thumb” which made me just like him, cool!  My first turned piece in grade school was a bowl with felt on the bottom as was the norm then.  Wood took a back seat for a while as work on the farm, schooling, and starting out as a mechanic in Saskatoon took over. I met this pretty little gal, Sheryl, and we started our life together.  I’ve always had a lot of irons in the fire so life consisted of woodworking, woodturning, fishing, helping my wife raise our wonderful son, racing with said son, and according to him now, me working too much along the way. I’ve spent my work life as an Industrial Mechanic or part owner of a waterjet/laser cutting job shop, switching back and forth along the way. I spend my leisure time now, turning and making lots of other things in the garage. My wife is wonderful help with turning as she is very artistic herself and helps me to see things differently. Our son, daughter-in-law and granddaughter live in town so I’m always finding ways to help out and spend time with them as well.

Earl Eidem

Earl Eidem

Biography

I turned my first bowl in Grade 12 shop class.  That was 1964.  My second bowl was turned in 2013.  Between turning the two bowls, I was busy with life and work.  As my retirement was nearing, I decided I needed a hobby to keep my mind and hands active, so I began making knives.  I enjoyed the outcome, but the process was too long and I couldn’t control all aspects as I didn’t have a kiln for heat treating the steel.  Then I thought of my first bowl and bought a used lathe.  I have been turning wood ever since.  I draw inspiration from nature and science as well as simply the desire to make nice things.  The idea for “Green and White” came to me from an incident that happened in my garage.  From a tree harvested from a neighbor’s yard, grew three fungi.  I watched them daily and took many photos.  This is my interpretation of the mushrooms that grew on that piece of Manitoba Maple sitting in my garage.

Rick Hounjet

Rick Hounjet

Biography

My name is Rick Hounjet and I was born and raised in Saskatoon.  At an early age I began to show an interest in woodworking.  I began with small scroll saw activities and moved on to more elaborate Intarsia.  Intarsia is a wood mosaic and my most accomplished piece is called “Hidden Forest”.  It consists of 556 pieces displaying a beautiful forest/wildlife scene. Later, I became interested in woodturning and joined the Hub City Woodturners Club. The members taught me many tricks of the trade from their years of experience.  Over the years, I gained knowledge and added my own techniques to create many beautiful pieces.  I enjoy using local and recycled wood and am still amazed by how beautiful the end product can become.  I have also recently been experimenting with wood dyes to enhance the beauty of the grain of the wood. I hope you enjoy my work. Check out my Facebook page called Chisels and Chips to see other wood projects I have completed.  Give it a like if you like.

Paul Schroeder

Paul Schroeder

Biography

I did my first woodturning while in a Grade 7 or 8 Industrial Arts class.  About 45 years later, when my father-in-law retired from dairy farming, he bought a wood lathe, and I was re-introduced to wood turning.  Much of my appreciation of small wooden artifacts comes from living in West Africa in the late 1970’s.  There, I watched carvers create wonderful sculptures using the simplest tools.  I especially enjoy making natural edge bowls and platters, and making laminated turnings using contrasting woods.

Trent Watts

Trent Watts

Biography

Typical of many prairie boys in the ’60’s, I grew up on a farm and was greatly influenced by my natural surroundings. Walking along cow trails ringed with prairie grasses, picking rocks and Saskatoon berries, watching migrating birds move with the changing seasons, riding horses and fixing fences, all had a profound effect on my early development. Those early years, my life’s work as a veterinarian, and my passions of photography and woodworking have greatly influenced how I spend my time. 

Duncan Birch

Duncan Birch

Biography

My interest in wood working was instilled in me at an early age.  I used to help and watch my dad with various wood projects.  At one point in my life, I built kitchen cabinets and various other household shelf units, dressers, china cabinets, etc. About 30 years ago I developed an interest in wood turning.  I joined the Sask. Woodworkers Guild and attending their meetings, I was blown away with the quality pieces that were being produced.  I bought a second-hand lathe and took some lessons through the Guild and have watched endless turning demonstrations on the internet as well as attending several symposiums.  I have had successes and failures and found that I learned more from my failures than from my successes.

Peter Christensen

Peter Christensen

Biography

I grew up and worked most of my life in the Fraser Valley in B.C.  My father was from Denmark, a cabinet maker and partner in a small company making Danish Modern furniture when I was little, evolving later into a company repairing and refinishing antiques for the auction houses.  As a kid I was always in the bush at home or at the neighbor’s making forts and tree houses from the trees that surrounded us.  When I got older, my father took me to work in the summer to strip furniture and help out in the shop.  I’m not sure if it was because he needed the help or if it was to keep me from annoying my mother.  I became an aircraft mechanic and when I had the resources started woodworking as a pastime with a now lifelong friend.  We pooled our tools and machines until we had places of our own, making furniture for our homes.  Wood turning was part of that passion, unique in that it is a stand-alone hobby and complementary to furniture making.  It will be a part of me for as long as time allows.

Jason Finkbeiner

Jason Finkbeiner

Biography

Jay is a fairly green turner, having a little over a year of experience. Years as a creative portrait photographer has given Jay a style that leans toward colourfulness, vibrancy, and non-conformity. In a world, where nothing under the sun is new, normal just won’t stand out and be seen. Synthetic materials, combining mediums, contemporary dyes and finishes, as well as integrating turning with electronics or other skillsets, make Jay’s turning work more closely align with his portraiture and person.

Gus Jacek

Gus Jacek

Biography

Gus turned his first piece in 1948 while attending the Saskatoon Technical Collegiate enrolled in the shops program which offered woodworking, welding, motor mechanics and machine shop. During his high school years Gus worked for VERBEKE’S Construction which lead to his obtaining a Journeyman certificate in Carpentry. After completing a bulk sales office in Coleville Sask. for High Way Refinery of Saskatoon he joined the company at Regina as a tradesman. In 1956 Gus joined British American Oil as a construction supervisor moving to Grande Prairie Alberta building service stations and bulk petroleum distribution in the Peace River region. This led to a career in marketing sales and management spanning some (33) thirty-three years and (3) three mergers he retired from Petro Canada in 1989 in Regina. After (2) days of retirement he joined Producers Pipeline who had just purchased the petroleum refinery from Petro Canada at Moose Jaw spending another (4) four years marketing liquid asphalt. Moving back to Saskatoon and retirement in 1995 he was invited by a friend, Ralph Reid to join the Saskatchewan Woodworkers Guild. Gus was finally able to assemble and use the wood lathe he built in high school.

Joining the guild and later the Hub City Turners has been very rewarding and beneficial for Gus as the wealth of knowledge and generous help when needed is priceless.

Mel Genge

Mel Genge

Biography

I joined the Saskatchewan Woodworkers Guild in 2000 and at one of the first meetings I attended, Michael Hosaluk did a demo on turning spinning tops. I knew then, that I wanted to learn to turn wood. I bought an old Rockwell Beaver lathe that came with a few tools and a One-Way Chuck for $200. The Guild was offering classes at Trent Watt’s shop so I decided to take one.  At the Guild meetings, I would try to sit close to the turners and soak up as much information as possible. In 2009 I became co-chair of the 2010 summer symposium in Saskatoon.  Mike Hosaluk was part of the Emma Collaboration and brought about 14 presenters to that event.  Since then, I have taken classes from many of those presenters. I am one of the founding members of the new Hub City Woodturners group and am a member of the Saskatchewan Craft Council, and the American Association of Woodturners.  I enjoy all aspects of turning and some of my work can be seen on Hub City Turners and Saskatchewan Craft Council web sites.

Deb McLeod

Deb McLeod

Biography

I was born in rural Saskatchewan in the town of Dodsland.  I spent many happy hours as a child with my brother exploring our environment and making all kinds of creations with wood.  The love of using wood and making things eventually led me to working 20 years as a carpenter. I was always fascinated by the idea of wood turning but didn’t know how to get started.  In June of 2007, my stepfather gave me some initial instruction, which fired the creative juices enough to make me a certified turning addict.  Taking classes from people like Jimmy Clewes, Michael Hosaluk, Bin Pho, Brian Macavoy and Trent Watts, as well as attending symposiums whenever possible has been a great way to learn the technical aspects of turning.  The world of wood turning has become a great passion for me and a wonderful way to spend my retirement.

Gary VonKuster

Gary VonKuster

Biography

“How long have you been turning?”  “About 5 years”, I quickly reply.  Then I immediately realize I have been saying that for three or four years, so that would make the correct answer 8 or 9 years.  Anyway, since I started turning, especially wood, everything seems to be going around and around and around.

These images display the work that each member was going to have on display in the show at Market Mall.

 

Click on an image then follow the arrows for a slide show.